NOTICE: Tuesday Session Cancellations

The following sessions have been canceled on Tuesday:

Title: Conversion of Multi-Site System from Form-Based Documentation to iView
Track: Nursing and Therapies
Time: 11:00am

Title: Automate Classification and Separation with KTM
Track: Imaging Informatics
Time: 3:30-4:30pm

We are sorry for any inconvenience this might cause.

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Device Connectivity with Tim Gee

Tim Gee is principal and founder of Medical Connectivity Consulting, which specializes in workflow automation through the integration of medical devices with information systems. Gee provides strategy development, marketing, product launches, business development, requirements and regulatory strategy for medical device and healthcare IT vendors serving ambulatory and acute care providers.

Gee will address more than 70 technology partners Tuesday during Device Forum at Cerner Health Conference. During his presentation, “Connectivity within Healthcare,” he will share the current state of medical device connectivity and a model for segmenting the market. Gee provides his insights below on medical device integration.

CHC Daily: How would you describe the current state of medical device connectivity?

Gee: In many ways, it’s very mature. First, let me define medical device connectivity: workflow automation through the integration of medical devices and information systems. I’ve been involved with medical device connectivity since the mid-80s when I worked for a company that wrote software for IBM PCs and Apple II computers. The cath lab was an early example of medical device connectivity.

In other respects, it’s very early, very new. The biggest differentiator today is that we’re focusing on medical devices and activities that take place at the point of care—particularly on nursing units. Many different kinds of workflows are being automated. The goal is not just the acquisition of data for charting purposes in an EMR. There is also alarm notification, remote surveillance of medical device data and waveforms, and possibly aggregating that data with information from other information systems. This allows presentation of more meaningful data than what you might get from separate systems—it creates a patient-centric view that changes over time. At this point, many manufacturers are struggling because they have never created connectivity applications before and don’t know how to develop requirements.

CHC Daily: What are the major barriers to medical device connectivity?

Gee: The two biggest barriers to connectivity involve regulations and standards. When dealing with medical device connectivity, systems integration becomes more complicated because much of what you are integrating is a regulated medical device. The FDA has published a draft rule that medical device data systems are a medical device and that they are going to reclassify them. In dealing with a systems integration process, the regulatory environment and quality systems that are required within that environment add to the cost and complexity of doing systems integration. In addition, there is a lack of standards on the medical device side. This lack of standards impacts product interfacing in the marketplace, which is inefficient.

CHC Daily: What are the primary reasons behind organizations’ desires for connectivity?

Gee: The primary reason for connectivity is to improve workflow automation. Many organizations have manual tasks that are partially or poorly automated that they want to improve. The reason they want to improve the task may be based on patient safety issues, like alarm notification. Alarm notification is an important safety issue because of alarm fatigue. Another reason for connectivity may be user productivity or user acceptance. While patient safety is a big factor in EMR charting, much of an organization’s desire to be connected has to do with nurse productivity and user acceptance of the EMR.

CHC Daily: What advice would you give organizations interested in device connectivity at their facilities?

Gee: The most important step an organization can take is to conduct an adequate needs assessment. Healthcare providers need to think more like product manufacturers. Manufacturers think about projects and products in the long-term and across their product portfolio. Healthcare providers need to think five years from now and five years out from that. They need to think about all of the different systems and technologies that come together at the point of care. That includes, but is not limited to, their clinical information system, electronic medication administration record and EMR. It also incorporates their wireless phone systems, patient flow applications or real-time positioning and messaging middleware for alarm notification.

CHC Daily: How will the connectivity market continue to expand?

Gee: There are several potential scenarios. The most optimistic is that the industry comes together through a new organization, or one that already exists, and makes decisions and adopts and implements standards that make plug-and-play connectivity a reality.

Be sure to visit the iCommand™ and MDBus™ pods in the Solutions Gallery to learn how Cerner can assist you with device connectivity.

Device Connectivity with Tim Gee

Tim Gee is principal and founder of Medical Connectivity Consulting, which specializes in workflow automation through the integration of medical devices with information systems. Gee provides strategy development, marketing, product launches, business development, requirements and regulatory strategy for medical device and healthcare IT vendors serving ambulatory and acute care providers.

Gee will address more than 70 technology partners Tuesday during Device Forum at Cerner Health Conference. During his presentation, “Connectivity within Healthcare,” he will share the current state of medical device connectivity and a model for segmenting the market. Gee provides his insights below on medical device integration.

CHC Daily: How would you describe the current state of medical device connectivity?

Gee: In many ways, it’s very mature. First, let me define medical device connectivity: workflow automation through the integration of medical devices and information systems. I’ve been involved with medical device connectivity since the mid-80s when I worked for a company that wrote software for IBM PCs and Apple II computers. The cath lab was an early example of medical device connectivity.

In other respects, it’s very early, very new. The biggest differentiator today is that we’re focusing on medical devices and activities that take place at the point of care—particularly on nursing units. Many different kinds of workflows are being automated. The goal is not just the acquisition of data for charting purposes in an EMR. There is also alarm notification, remote surveillance of medical device data and waveforms, and possibly aggregating that data with information from other information systems. This allows presentation of more meaningful data than what you might get from separate systems—it creates a patient-centric view that changes over time. At this point, many manufacturers are struggling because they have never created connectivity applications before and don’t know how to develop requirements.

CHC Daily: What are the major barriers to medical device connectivity?

Gee: The two biggest barriers to connectivity involve regulations and standards. When dealing with medical device connectivity, systems integration becomes more complicated because much of what you are integrating is a regulated medical device. The FDA has published a draft rule that medical device data systems are a medical device and that they are going to reclassify them. In dealing with a systems integration process, the regulatory environment and quality systems that are required within that environment add to the cost and complexity of doing systems integration. In addition, there is a lack of standards on the medical device side. This lack of standards impacts product interfacing in the marketplace, which is inefficient.

CHC Daily: What are the primary reasons behind organizations’ desires for connectivity?

Gee: The primary reason for connectivity is to improve workflow automation. Many organizations have manual tasks that are partially or poorly automated that they want to improve. The reason they want to improve the task may be based on patient safety issues, like alarm notification. Alarm notification is an important safety issue because of alarm fatigue. Another reason for connectivity may be user productivity or user acceptance. While patient safety is a big factor in EMR charting, much of an organization’s desire to be connected has to do with nurse productivity and user acceptance of the EMR.

CHC Daily: What advice would you give organizations interested in device connectivity at their facilities?

Gee: The most important step an organization can take is to conduct an adequate needs assessment. Healthcare providers need to think more like product manufacturers. Manufacturers think about projects and products in the long-term and across their product portfolio. Healthcare providers need to think five years from now and five years out from that. They need to think about all of the different systems and technologies that come together at the point of care. That includes, but is not limited to, their clinical information system, electronic medication administration record and EMR. It also incorporates their wireless phone systems, patient flow applications or real-time positioning and messaging middleware for alarm notification.

CHC Daily: How will the connectivity market continue to expand?

Gee: There are several potential scenarios. The most optimistic is that the industry comes together through a new organization, or one that already exists, and makes decisions and adopts and implements standards that make plug-and-play connectivity a reality.

Be sure to visit the iCommand™ and MDBus™ pods in the Solutions Gallery to learn how Cerner can assist you with device connectivity.

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Reactions to Neal Patterson’s Keynote

Cerner CEO and Co-Founder Neal Patterson addressed the General Session of CHC this morning. For those in attendance, it was a powerful and emotional presentation as Neal gave insights into his own personal experience with the healthcare system and laid out Cerner’s “next 30 years”.

Here are some of the reactions after the session:

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Ramsey’s 4 Questions with Mitch Joel

Kansas City video-blogger Ramsey Mohsen had the chance to interview Mitch Joel after his CHC keynote on Sunday night on camera. Here is their conversation.

Sites mentioned in the video blog:

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CHC Daily – Monday

Monday’s issue of the CHC Daily is available. If you couldn’t attend Sunday’s keynote session, get a recap of Mitch Joel’s presentation, learn more about Cerner’s Flu Pandemic Initiative, and much more about what’s going on at CHC. The Daily is also a great way to share information about Mitch’s speech with others who were not able to attend CHC.

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Voices from Registration

We took some quick interviews of attendees at the registration desk yesterday. We wanted to know what people are excited about and what they were looking forward to. Here are some of their reactions:

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5 Questions with Mitch Joel

Digital marketing visionary Mitch Joel is the author of Six Pixels of Separation and president of Twist Image, an award-winning digital marketing and communications agency. On Sunday evening, Joel shared his insights on digital marketing and personal branding to thousands of Cerner Health Conference attendees during his keynote address. Below, Joel discusses how digital marketing is changing the landscape—even the healthcare landscape—and how it can work for you.

CHC Daily: How do you think your message translates to healthcare organizations?

Joel: Fundamentally, the message is universal. We live in a very strange, beautiful, new and different world where people are using all forms of information to connect and learn more. When it comes to healthcare, we are seeing staggering things. On Sept. 30, there was a report in Marketing Charts that said 360 U.S. hospitals use social media. People use social media in very different ways—YouTube channels, Facebook, Twitter accounts and blogs.

In healthcare, there’s been tremendous power and push from patients looking to social media channels for answers and research. Health and healthcare is everyone’s No. 1 concern in life—anyone who has ever been sick knows that. People are no longer going to their doctors for answers. They are empowering themselves through online social networks and databases to be informed so that when they go to the doctor they are armed with recommended medication and prescription regimens. That message translates to healthcare professionals—the idea of transparency and opening up to consumer feedback and the digitization of information. When you look at the digitization of the industry, the implications of the Internet and technology, healthcare becomes ground zero—the perfect place to get more efficient, be more open and help people get better faster.

CHC Daily: If I was new to the world of Web 2.0, what are the first three things I should do to get up to speed?

Joel: Use listening tools. Hop on to Google News Alerts and sign up for yourself, brands you represent, competitors you deal with, the industry you serve, select some key words and start listening. You will see all sorts of news and information about what is going on in your space that you may have never been aware of. It also gives you a temperament where you understand the voice of the consumer, of what works and what gets traffic.

Aggregate. I use Google Reader, where I can bring in any blog or anything that has an RSS feed into it, including CNN. It’s amazing that I can take all these divergent digital platforms—whether it’s Delicious, Technorati or Twitter—and centralize them in one place. I no longer have a world where I get up in the morning and fire open a browser to go through my bookmarks and see what’s new on sites. Google Reader pulls it all in and notifies me when it’s been updated. People ask me, how do you have time for everything, but it’s pretty easy because I have it centralized, and I can zip through things really fast and efficiently.

Listen in on Twitter and use search.twitter.com or TweetDeck to follow the key words you used in (Google) News Alerts and in Twitter. When it comes to health, people are looking to Twitter and social networks to see what other people are saying. The best thing you can do to learn and get engaged is to hear and feel conversations that are happening when they are taking place.

CHC Daily: How do I know whom to follow on Twitter?

Joel: You don’t know whom to follow on Twitter. You have to start out following a lot of different people and see who works best for you. Basically, you develop a relationship. You have to meet people, connect, put yourself into different scenarios and see if it’s a good fit. As you do it more and more, it’s easier to discern a good fit. One of the first things to do is to get on a search engine, like Google, Bing or Yahoo, type in healthcare Twitter, and see what it recommends. It should provide recommendations on the top 10 or top 50 healthcare blog posts.

CHC Daily: What if I don’t have anything interesting to say?

Joel: Listen and find your voice. You can’t be shy. At first, you might contribute a small item, then a longer thought piece, a commentary on a news item or a link you find interesting. While you think you don’t have anything interesting to say, you might be surprised. It’s important to be authentic and real and put on information that you yourself find interesting. People will find you, and you will find more people, more like-minded people, and that’s the beauty of this.

CHC Daily: What is the best way for someone to get involved?

Joel: The best way to get involved is to become a leader. Look at Unconferences or even blogs, but you don’t have to start your own blog. There are many successful, highly trafficked healthcare blogs. Become active in the comment section of one of these successful blogs. Add your voice, add your thoughts. Or, become a leader in the Unconference movement. Run one in your community. Gather people together in your community and discuss a book you found interesting in this new space. Remember, it’s not just about connecting online. You can take it out into the real world and bring your online connections to life with Meetups and Tweetups.

Mitch’s book, Six Pixels of Separation: Everyone is Connected. Connect Your Business to Everyone is available now.

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CHC Daily

Want to catch up on the day’s activities at the Cerner Health Conference, or preview what’s coming up the rest of the week? Make the CHC Daily a part of your CHC experience.

Sunday’s edition includes information on this year’s theme (Get Connected), as well as a preview of Monday’s Power Sessions and a Q&A session with a client.

We’ll update you here when each day’s edition is available.

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Stuffing Registration Bags

Organizing CHC Registration Bags

Cerner Associate Jennifer Kraxner really went beyond the call of duty to organize the registration bags that all CHC attendees receive when they check in. Inside each bag is a hand-washed aluminum water bottle for all attendees to use as part of Cerner’s Go Green initiative.

CHC09 009

There will be water bottles throughout the convention center so be sure to bring your bottle with you to all your sessions.

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See you here!

Reg Desk

Pre-conference workshops are already well under way. The Solutions Gallery is prepped. We’re expecting a great show!

We’ll be updating the blog all week, so stay tuned and be sure to follow us on Twitter.

We can’t wait to see you here in Kansas City!

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