Archives for the 'Speaker Profile' Category

Interview with Dr. David Voran

Dr. David Voran is the Medical Director of Clinical Process Improvement at Heartland Health. He presented at CHC with Director of uCern Brian Carter on the topic of “Social Media in Healthcare.” Dr. Voran is extremely adept in these channels and maintains a Twitter account, a Facebook page and a blog. I spent a couple minutes talking with him after his session, which was extremely insightful on the role of social media in healthcare.

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Device Connectivity with Tim Gee

Tim Gee is principal and founder of Medical Connectivity Consulting, which specializes in workflow automation through the integration of medical devices with information systems. Gee provides strategy development, marketing, product launches, business development, requirements and regulatory strategy for medical device and healthcare IT vendors serving ambulatory and acute care providers.

Gee will address more than 70 technology partners Tuesday during Device Forum at Cerner Health Conference. During his presentation, “Connectivity within Healthcare,” he will share the current state of medical device connectivity and a model for segmenting the market. Gee provides his insights below on medical device integration.

CHC Daily: How would you describe the current state of medical device connectivity?

Gee: In many ways, it’s very mature. First, let me define medical device connectivity: workflow automation through the integration of medical devices and information systems. I’ve been involved with medical device connectivity since the mid-80s when I worked for a company that wrote software for IBM PCs and Apple II computers. The cath lab was an early example of medical device connectivity.

In other respects, it’s very early, very new. The biggest differentiator today is that we’re focusing on medical devices and activities that take place at the point of care—particularly on nursing units. Many different kinds of workflows are being automated. The goal is not just the acquisition of data for charting purposes in an EMR. There is also alarm notification, remote surveillance of medical device data and waveforms, and possibly aggregating that data with information from other information systems. This allows presentation of more meaningful data than what you might get from separate systems—it creates a patient-centric view that changes over time. At this point, many manufacturers are struggling because they have never created connectivity applications before and don’t know how to develop requirements.

CHC Daily: What are the major barriers to medical device connectivity?

Gee: The two biggest barriers to connectivity involve regulations and standards. When dealing with medical device connectivity, systems integration becomes more complicated because much of what you are integrating is a regulated medical device. The FDA has published a draft rule that medical device data systems are a medical device and that they are going to reclassify them. In dealing with a systems integration process, the regulatory environment and quality systems that are required within that environment add to the cost and complexity of doing systems integration. In addition, there is a lack of standards on the medical device side. This lack of standards impacts product interfacing in the marketplace, which is inefficient.

CHC Daily: What are the primary reasons behind organizations’ desires for connectivity?

Gee: The primary reason for connectivity is to improve workflow automation. Many organizations have manual tasks that are partially or poorly automated that they want to improve. The reason they want to improve the task may be based on patient safety issues, like alarm notification. Alarm notification is an important safety issue because of alarm fatigue. Another reason for connectivity may be user productivity or user acceptance. While patient safety is a big factor in EMR charting, much of an organization’s desire to be connected has to do with nurse productivity and user acceptance of the EMR.

CHC Daily: What advice would you give organizations interested in device connectivity at their facilities?

Gee: The most important step an organization can take is to conduct an adequate needs assessment. Healthcare providers need to think more like product manufacturers. Manufacturers think about projects and products in the long-term and across their product portfolio. Healthcare providers need to think five years from now and five years out from that. They need to think about all of the different systems and technologies that come together at the point of care. That includes, but is not limited to, their clinical information system, electronic medication administration record and EMR. It also incorporates their wireless phone systems, patient flow applications or real-time positioning and messaging middleware for alarm notification.

CHC Daily: How will the connectivity market continue to expand?

Gee: There are several potential scenarios. The most optimistic is that the industry comes together through a new organization, or one that already exists, and makes decisions and adopts and implements standards that make plug-and-play connectivity a reality.

Be sure to visit the iCommand™ and MDBus™ pods in the Solutions Gallery to learn how Cerner can assist you with device connectivity.

Device Connectivity with Tim Gee

Tim Gee is principal and founder of Medical Connectivity Consulting, which specializes in workflow automation through the integration of medical devices with information systems. Gee provides strategy development, marketing, product launches, business development, requirements and regulatory strategy for medical device and healthcare IT vendors serving ambulatory and acute care providers.

Gee will address more than 70 technology partners Tuesday during Device Forum at Cerner Health Conference. During his presentation, “Connectivity within Healthcare,” he will share the current state of medical device connectivity and a model for segmenting the market. Gee provides his insights below on medical device integration.

CHC Daily: How would you describe the current state of medical device connectivity?

Gee: In many ways, it’s very mature. First, let me define medical device connectivity: workflow automation through the integration of medical devices and information systems. I’ve been involved with medical device connectivity since the mid-80s when I worked for a company that wrote software for IBM PCs and Apple II computers. The cath lab was an early example of medical device connectivity.

In other respects, it’s very early, very new. The biggest differentiator today is that we’re focusing on medical devices and activities that take place at the point of care—particularly on nursing units. Many different kinds of workflows are being automated. The goal is not just the acquisition of data for charting purposes in an EMR. There is also alarm notification, remote surveillance of medical device data and waveforms, and possibly aggregating that data with information from other information systems. This allows presentation of more meaningful data than what you might get from separate systems—it creates a patient-centric view that changes over time. At this point, many manufacturers are struggling because they have never created connectivity applications before and don’t know how to develop requirements.

CHC Daily: What are the major barriers to medical device connectivity?

Gee: The two biggest barriers to connectivity involve regulations and standards. When dealing with medical device connectivity, systems integration becomes more complicated because much of what you are integrating is a regulated medical device. The FDA has published a draft rule that medical device data systems are a medical device and that they are going to reclassify them. In dealing with a systems integration process, the regulatory environment and quality systems that are required within that environment add to the cost and complexity of doing systems integration. In addition, there is a lack of standards on the medical device side. This lack of standards impacts product interfacing in the marketplace, which is inefficient.

CHC Daily: What are the primary reasons behind organizations’ desires for connectivity?

Gee: The primary reason for connectivity is to improve workflow automation. Many organizations have manual tasks that are partially or poorly automated that they want to improve. The reason they want to improve the task may be based on patient safety issues, like alarm notification. Alarm notification is an important safety issue because of alarm fatigue. Another reason for connectivity may be user productivity or user acceptance. While patient safety is a big factor in EMR charting, much of an organization’s desire to be connected has to do with nurse productivity and user acceptance of the EMR.

CHC Daily: What advice would you give organizations interested in device connectivity at their facilities?

Gee: The most important step an organization can take is to conduct an adequate needs assessment. Healthcare providers need to think more like product manufacturers. Manufacturers think about projects and products in the long-term and across their product portfolio. Healthcare providers need to think five years from now and five years out from that. They need to think about all of the different systems and technologies that come together at the point of care. That includes, but is not limited to, their clinical information system, electronic medication administration record and EMR. It also incorporates their wireless phone systems, patient flow applications or real-time positioning and messaging middleware for alarm notification.

CHC Daily: How will the connectivity market continue to expand?

Gee: There are several potential scenarios. The most optimistic is that the industry comes together through a new organization, or one that already exists, and makes decisions and adopts and implements standards that make plug-and-play connectivity a reality.

Be sure to visit the iCommand™ and MDBus™ pods in the Solutions Gallery to learn how Cerner can assist you with device connectivity.

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Ramsey’s 4 Questions with Mitch Joel

Kansas City video-blogger Ramsey Mohsen had the chance to interview Mitch Joel after his CHC keynote on Sunday night on camera. Here is their conversation.

Sites mentioned in the video blog:

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5 Questions with Mitch Joel

Digital marketing visionary Mitch Joel is the author of Six Pixels of Separation and president of Twist Image, an award-winning digital marketing and communications agency. On Sunday evening, Joel shared his insights on digital marketing and personal branding to thousands of Cerner Health Conference attendees during his keynote address. Below, Joel discusses how digital marketing is changing the landscape—even the healthcare landscape—and how it can work for you.

CHC Daily: How do you think your message translates to healthcare organizations?

Joel: Fundamentally, the message is universal. We live in a very strange, beautiful, new and different world where people are using all forms of information to connect and learn more. When it comes to healthcare, we are seeing staggering things. On Sept. 30, there was a report in Marketing Charts that said 360 U.S. hospitals use social media. People use social media in very different ways—YouTube channels, Facebook, Twitter accounts and blogs.

In healthcare, there’s been tremendous power and push from patients looking to social media channels for answers and research. Health and healthcare is everyone’s No. 1 concern in life—anyone who has ever been sick knows that. People are no longer going to their doctors for answers. They are empowering themselves through online social networks and databases to be informed so that when they go to the doctor they are armed with recommended medication and prescription regimens. That message translates to healthcare professionals—the idea of transparency and opening up to consumer feedback and the digitization of information. When you look at the digitization of the industry, the implications of the Internet and technology, healthcare becomes ground zero—the perfect place to get more efficient, be more open and help people get better faster.

CHC Daily: If I was new to the world of Web 2.0, what are the first three things I should do to get up to speed?

Joel: Use listening tools. Hop on to Google News Alerts and sign up for yourself, brands you represent, competitors you deal with, the industry you serve, select some key words and start listening. You will see all sorts of news and information about what is going on in your space that you may have never been aware of. It also gives you a temperament where you understand the voice of the consumer, of what works and what gets traffic.

Aggregate. I use Google Reader, where I can bring in any blog or anything that has an RSS feed into it, including CNN. It’s amazing that I can take all these divergent digital platforms—whether it’s Delicious, Technorati or Twitter—and centralize them in one place. I no longer have a world where I get up in the morning and fire open a browser to go through my bookmarks and see what’s new on sites. Google Reader pulls it all in and notifies me when it’s been updated. People ask me, how do you have time for everything, but it’s pretty easy because I have it centralized, and I can zip through things really fast and efficiently.

Listen in on Twitter and use search.twitter.com or TweetDeck to follow the key words you used in (Google) News Alerts and in Twitter. When it comes to health, people are looking to Twitter and social networks to see what other people are saying. The best thing you can do to learn and get engaged is to hear and feel conversations that are happening when they are taking place.

CHC Daily: How do I know whom to follow on Twitter?

Joel: You don’t know whom to follow on Twitter. You have to start out following a lot of different people and see who works best for you. Basically, you develop a relationship. You have to meet people, connect, put yourself into different scenarios and see if it’s a good fit. As you do it more and more, it’s easier to discern a good fit. One of the first things to do is to get on a search engine, like Google, Bing or Yahoo, type in healthcare Twitter, and see what it recommends. It should provide recommendations on the top 10 or top 50 healthcare blog posts.

CHC Daily: What if I don’t have anything interesting to say?

Joel: Listen and find your voice. You can’t be shy. At first, you might contribute a small item, then a longer thought piece, a commentary on a news item or a link you find interesting. While you think you don’t have anything interesting to say, you might be surprised. It’s important to be authentic and real and put on information that you yourself find interesting. People will find you, and you will find more people, more like-minded people, and that’s the beauty of this.

CHC Daily: What is the best way for someone to get involved?

Joel: The best way to get involved is to become a leader. Look at Unconferences or even blogs, but you don’t have to start your own blog. There are many successful, highly trafficked healthcare blogs. Become active in the comment section of one of these successful blogs. Add your voice, add your thoughts. Or, become a leader in the Unconference movement. Run one in your community. Gather people together in your community and discuss a book you found interesting in this new space. Remember, it’s not just about connecting online. You can take it out into the real world and bring your online connections to life with Meetups and Tweetups.

Mitch’s book, Six Pixels of Separation: Everyone is Connected. Connect Your Business to Everyone is available now.

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HHS Secretary Sebelius to Speak at CHC

Official Photo of Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius

We are very excited to announce that Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius will be a keynote speaker at this year’s Cerner Health Conference.

Secretary Sebelius will be delivering her keynote address on Tuesday, October 6 at 8 a.m. CT on the topic of healthcare reform. She joins Twist Image’s Mitch Joel and Cerner CEO Neal Patterson in a lineup of excellent keynote speakers for the conference.

We’re thrilled to welcome Secretary Sebelius to CHC.

[Official Cerner Press Release]

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Mitch Joel to Speak on Sunday

There’s been a slight change in when Mitch Joel will give his keynote address to the Cerner Health Conference. Mitch will now be opening the conference on Sunday night at 5:00 p.m.

Mitch Joel

We’re looking forward to hearing Mitch’s energizing talk about how everyone is connected through Six Pixels of Separation.

After his keynote address, Mitch will be signing books in the Solutions Gallery until about 7:30 p.m. Books will be available for purchase (cash only) on site for or you can purchase Six Pixels of Separation on Amazon.com in advance of the conference.

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6 Things to Know About CHC Keynote Mitch Joel

The following is a guest post from Chris Brogan.

I met Mitch Joel at the first ever PodCamp, and was instantly a fan. Mitch radiates a mix of cool and compassion, and he finds the time to talk with anyone serious about the future of marketing and online business relationships. Recently, his book, Six Pixels of Separation, came out and is already rushing up the charts. It should. It’s full of great stuff. I thought I’d share with you six things to know about Mitch Joel, as a way to introduce you to the man behind the book.

  1. Mitch brings passion and solid case studies to his presentations. We usually get one or the other. Mitch does an amazing job of telling people the facts while telling passionate stories in between. He is a master at blending details with memorable stories.
  2. Mitch turns slides into an art form. Watching Mitch present is like watching a well-produced TV special. His use of interesting imagery and interaction with the audience is a talent to be appreciated (and then studied). Watching him perform is a lesson in how the best do what they do.
  3. Mitch gets around. Did you know that Mitch has shared the stage with Bill Clinton, Anthony Robbins and Dr. Phil? We have that last guy in common, as I was on the Dr. Phil show, but I’ve yet to meet a former US President and “Mr. Teeth” himself, Anthony Robbins.
  4. Mitch is passionate about music. He co-launched Distort Entertainment, the only hard music label in Canada to have major label distribution (Universal Music) and whose roster features the platinum-plus, Juno Award and MuchMusic Video Award-winning acts, Alexisonfire and City And Colour.
  5. Mitch keeps a foot in both worlds. His efforts as a professional journalist and digital marketer aren’t the same as his work with podcasting and blogging and connecting at geek dinners. Mitch does both the professional/traditional world, as well as the new media realm. It’s not common yet. As Mitch can speak in both languages, it makes him even more valuable.
  6. Mitch gives you actions to take. I’ve read Six Pixels of Separation twice so far. The book is jammed full of actionable steps you might consider taking. Every few sections, there’s a new list of considerations, or some checklists of value. The book is a blueprint for what you need to know about the next few years.

If you’re not yet thrilled and excited about your chance to see Mitch speak at CHC in October, I’m not sure what else I can say. This is the opportunity of a lifetime, so get ready. Check out Mitch’s Blog, and read a few online reviews of his book. You’ll love it.

Chris Brogan is the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling co-author of Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust. He writes about social media and how human business works at [chrisbrogan.com]

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Keynote Speaker – Mitch Joel

Mitch Joel

When we sought out a speaker for CHC this year, we wanted someone who has the ability to tell an engaging story of how Cerner partners, clients and associates can get connected. We immediately turned to Mitch Joel, President of Twist Image.

From his blog, Six Pixels of Separation:

When Google wanted to explain online marketing to the top brands in the world, they brought Mitch Joel to the Googleplex in Mountain View, California. Marketing Magazine dubbed him the “Rock Star of Digital Marketing” and called him, “one of North America’s leading digital visionaries.” In 2006 he was named one of the most influential authorities on Blog Marketing in the world. Mitch Joel is President of Twist Image – an award-winning Digital Marketing and Communications agency. He has been called a marketing and communications visionary, interactive expert and community leader. He is also a Blogger, Podcaster, passionate entrepreneur and speaker who connects with people worldwide by sharing his marketing insights on digital marketing and personal branding. In 2008, Mitch was named Canada’s Most Influential Male in Social Media, one of the top 100 online marketers in the world, and was awarded the highly-prestigious Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 (recognizing individuals who have achieved a significant amount of success but have not yet reached the age of 40).

We at Cerner are extremely excited to have Mitch share the message of his recently released book, Six Pixels of SeparationEveryone is connected. Connect your business to everyone. We are looking forward to hearing his ideas during his opening keynote message Sunday, October 4. CHC Attendees will hear first-hand how to easily apply his methods in their own organizations.

Collaboration between Cerner users is already occurring in uCern. Be sure to sign up and be a part of the conversation!

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