Archives for October, 2009

CHC by the numbers

  • Over 6,000 attendees
  • 20 countries over 6 continents represented
  • 700+ organizations
  • 262 sessions
  • 19 content tracks
  • 14 power sessions
  • 311 continuing education hours offered (63% of sessions qualified for CE)
  • More than 359 articles written, posted or broadcast
  • More than 7 million media impressions
  • Seven smart rooms
  • 4 keynote addresses
  • 21 consecutive top 40 hits by the featured band at The Bash
  • 12,000 lunches
  • 3,400 totebags
  • 950,000 sq. ft. of carpet
  • Over 1,100 clinicians
  • almost 300 volunteers
  • 1,000 EPS devices
  • 2582 hotel rooms (for 8860 room nights)
  • 6,090 attendee badges
  • 70+ networking opportunities
  • 4 CHC Dailies
  • Over 110 partners and sponsors
  • Nearly 400 client and industry presenters
  • 10 truckloads of equipment for the solutions gallery
  • Over 400 laptops for session scanning and registration

Be sure to mark your calendar for next year’s Cerner Health Conference — October 10-13, 2010! We look forward to seeing you there! Also, be sure to stay tuned to this blog (or subscribe to our RSS feed) and the CHC site for more information and educational opportunities and please follow CHC on Twitter.

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Photos from The Bash

All photos taken by Steve Puppe.

We hope that everyone enjoyed The Bash last night as much as we did. A big thank you to all of our vendors and to Fujitsu for sponsoring the event. Great food. Great music. Great people.

Enjoy the final day of the conference!

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Interview with Dr. David Voran

Dr. David Voran is the Medical Director of Clinical Process Improvement at Heartland Health. He presented at CHC with Director of uCern Brian Carter on the topic of “Social Media in Healthcare.” Dr. Voran is extremely adept in these channels and maintains a Twitter account, a Facebook page and a blog. I spent a couple minutes talking with him after his session, which was extremely insightful on the role of social media in healthcare.

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CHC Daily – Tuesday

Another day, another CHC Daily. Read Tuesday’s edition for:

  • Key points from Neal Patterson’s keynote on Monday
  • Information on the Physician Forum
  • Insight into how UAB Health System is using CareAware MDBus to improve patient safety.

Archives from the Daily will be available after the conference, so check back at http://www.cerner.com/chcdaily when you get home.

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Reaction to Sec. Sebelius Morning Keynote

HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius addressed the general session this morning on the subject of healthcare reform. She shared information about the Flu Pandemic Initiative — a collaboration between Cerner, the HHS and the CDC. For more information, be sure to pick up the CHC Daily.

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Don’t Miss the Bash!

Bash

Don’t miss tonight’s celebration at KC Live! in the Power & Light District. Sample food from some of the district’s finest restaurants and then cut loose with legendary rock band, Three Dog Night.

Bring your appetite and enjoy a sampling of Kansas City’s favorite dishes from the following restaurants:

  • 801 Chophouse
  • Bristol Seafood Grill
  • Chef BURGER
  • Famous Dave’s
  • Flying Saucer Draught Emporium
  • Genghis Grill
  • Mema’s Bakery
  • Peach Tree
  • Raglan Road Irish Pub & Restaurant

You may also stroll into the following restaurants to taste some of their fares:

  • Gordon Biersch Brewery
  • McFadden’s Sports Saloon
  • Maker’s Mark Bourbon House
  • Pizza Bar
  • Tengo Sed Cantina

At 8:30 p.m., the chart-topping entertainment of Three Dog Night begins. Entering its fourth decade, Three Dog Night continues to top the list of artists with the best “Billboard Top 100 Chart” average.

So, warm up those vocal cords and come on down to the Power & Light District. This is one party you won’t want to miss.

Don’t forget your conference badge, wristband and drink tickets!

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NOTICE: Tuesday Session Cancellations

The following sessions have been canceled on Tuesday:

Title: Conversion of Multi-Site System from Form-Based Documentation to iView
Track: Nursing and Therapies
Time: 11:00am

Title: Automate Classification and Separation with KTM
Track: Imaging Informatics
Time: 3:30-4:30pm

We are sorry for any inconvenience this might cause.

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Device Connectivity with Tim Gee

Tim Gee is principal and founder of Medical Connectivity Consulting, which specializes in workflow automation through the integration of medical devices with information systems. Gee provides strategy development, marketing, product launches, business development, requirements and regulatory strategy for medical device and healthcare IT vendors serving ambulatory and acute care providers.

Gee will address more than 70 technology partners Tuesday during Device Forum at Cerner Health Conference. During his presentation, “Connectivity within Healthcare,” he will share the current state of medical device connectivity and a model for segmenting the market. Gee provides his insights below on medical device integration.

CHC Daily: How would you describe the current state of medical device connectivity?

Gee: In many ways, it’s very mature. First, let me define medical device connectivity: workflow automation through the integration of medical devices and information systems. I’ve been involved with medical device connectivity since the mid-80s when I worked for a company that wrote software for IBM PCs and Apple II computers. The cath lab was an early example of medical device connectivity.

In other respects, it’s very early, very new. The biggest differentiator today is that we’re focusing on medical devices and activities that take place at the point of care—particularly on nursing units. Many different kinds of workflows are being automated. The goal is not just the acquisition of data for charting purposes in an EMR. There is also alarm notification, remote surveillance of medical device data and waveforms, and possibly aggregating that data with information from other information systems. This allows presentation of more meaningful data than what you might get from separate systems—it creates a patient-centric view that changes over time. At this point, many manufacturers are struggling because they have never created connectivity applications before and don’t know how to develop requirements.

CHC Daily: What are the major barriers to medical device connectivity?

Gee: The two biggest barriers to connectivity involve regulations and standards. When dealing with medical device connectivity, systems integration becomes more complicated because much of what you are integrating is a regulated medical device. The FDA has published a draft rule that medical device data systems are a medical device and that they are going to reclassify them. In dealing with a systems integration process, the regulatory environment and quality systems that are required within that environment add to the cost and complexity of doing systems integration. In addition, there is a lack of standards on the medical device side. This lack of standards impacts product interfacing in the marketplace, which is inefficient.

CHC Daily: What are the primary reasons behind organizations’ desires for connectivity?

Gee: The primary reason for connectivity is to improve workflow automation. Many organizations have manual tasks that are partially or poorly automated that they want to improve. The reason they want to improve the task may be based on patient safety issues, like alarm notification. Alarm notification is an important safety issue because of alarm fatigue. Another reason for connectivity may be user productivity or user acceptance. While patient safety is a big factor in EMR charting, much of an organization’s desire to be connected has to do with nurse productivity and user acceptance of the EMR.

CHC Daily: What advice would you give organizations interested in device connectivity at their facilities?

Gee: The most important step an organization can take is to conduct an adequate needs assessment. Healthcare providers need to think more like product manufacturers. Manufacturers think about projects and products in the long-term and across their product portfolio. Healthcare providers need to think five years from now and five years out from that. They need to think about all of the different systems and technologies that come together at the point of care. That includes, but is not limited to, their clinical information system, electronic medication administration record and EMR. It also incorporates their wireless phone systems, patient flow applications or real-time positioning and messaging middleware for alarm notification.

CHC Daily: How will the connectivity market continue to expand?

Gee: There are several potential scenarios. The most optimistic is that the industry comes together through a new organization, or one that already exists, and makes decisions and adopts and implements standards that make plug-and-play connectivity a reality.

Be sure to visit the iCommand™ and MDBus™ pods in the Solutions Gallery to learn how Cerner can assist you with device connectivity.

Device Connectivity with Tim Gee

Tim Gee is principal and founder of Medical Connectivity Consulting, which specializes in workflow automation through the integration of medical devices with information systems. Gee provides strategy development, marketing, product launches, business development, requirements and regulatory strategy for medical device and healthcare IT vendors serving ambulatory and acute care providers.

Gee will address more than 70 technology partners Tuesday during Device Forum at Cerner Health Conference. During his presentation, “Connectivity within Healthcare,” he will share the current state of medical device connectivity and a model for segmenting the market. Gee provides his insights below on medical device integration.

CHC Daily: How would you describe the current state of medical device connectivity?

Gee: In many ways, it’s very mature. First, let me define medical device connectivity: workflow automation through the integration of medical devices and information systems. I’ve been involved with medical device connectivity since the mid-80s when I worked for a company that wrote software for IBM PCs and Apple II computers. The cath lab was an early example of medical device connectivity.

In other respects, it’s very early, very new. The biggest differentiator today is that we’re focusing on medical devices and activities that take place at the point of care—particularly on nursing units. Many different kinds of workflows are being automated. The goal is not just the acquisition of data for charting purposes in an EMR. There is also alarm notification, remote surveillance of medical device data and waveforms, and possibly aggregating that data with information from other information systems. This allows presentation of more meaningful data than what you might get from separate systems—it creates a patient-centric view that changes over time. At this point, many manufacturers are struggling because they have never created connectivity applications before and don’t know how to develop requirements.

CHC Daily: What are the major barriers to medical device connectivity?

Gee: The two biggest barriers to connectivity involve regulations and standards. When dealing with medical device connectivity, systems integration becomes more complicated because much of what you are integrating is a regulated medical device. The FDA has published a draft rule that medical device data systems are a medical device and that they are going to reclassify them. In dealing with a systems integration process, the regulatory environment and quality systems that are required within that environment add to the cost and complexity of doing systems integration. In addition, there is a lack of standards on the medical device side. This lack of standards impacts product interfacing in the marketplace, which is inefficient.

CHC Daily: What are the primary reasons behind organizations’ desires for connectivity?

Gee: The primary reason for connectivity is to improve workflow automation. Many organizations have manual tasks that are partially or poorly automated that they want to improve. The reason they want to improve the task may be based on patient safety issues, like alarm notification. Alarm notification is an important safety issue because of alarm fatigue. Another reason for connectivity may be user productivity or user acceptance. While patient safety is a big factor in EMR charting, much of an organization’s desire to be connected has to do with nurse productivity and user acceptance of the EMR.

CHC Daily: What advice would you give organizations interested in device connectivity at their facilities?

Gee: The most important step an organization can take is to conduct an adequate needs assessment. Healthcare providers need to think more like product manufacturers. Manufacturers think about projects and products in the long-term and across their product portfolio. Healthcare providers need to think five years from now and five years out from that. They need to think about all of the different systems and technologies that come together at the point of care. That includes, but is not limited to, their clinical information system, electronic medication administration record and EMR. It also incorporates their wireless phone systems, patient flow applications or real-time positioning and messaging middleware for alarm notification.

CHC Daily: How will the connectivity market continue to expand?

Gee: There are several potential scenarios. The most optimistic is that the industry comes together through a new organization, or one that already exists, and makes decisions and adopts and implements standards that make plug-and-play connectivity a reality.

Be sure to visit the iCommand™ and MDBus™ pods in the Solutions Gallery to learn how Cerner can assist you with device connectivity.

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Reactions to Neal Patterson’s Keynote

Cerner CEO and Co-Founder Neal Patterson addressed the General Session of CHC this morning. For those in attendance, it was a powerful and emotional presentation as Neal gave insights into his own personal experience with the healthcare system and laid out Cerner’s “next 30 years”.

Here are some of the reactions after the session:

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Ramsey’s 4 Questions with Mitch Joel

Kansas City video-blogger Ramsey Mohsen had the chance to interview Mitch Joel after his CHC keynote on Sunday night on camera. Here is their conversation.

Sites mentioned in the video blog:

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